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Seaweed for the summer!

Eating seaweed for the summer might just help you get summer ready Seaweed is the superfood of 2017, so why not make summer 2017 the summer when you discover the benefits of seaweed for yourself? Getting into seaweed for the summer can increase your health and wellbeing in many ways. Seaweed increases weight management Specific species of seaweed have been discovered to help reduce the breakdown of fats in the body, allowing for less fat is absorbed and more to simply be passed through you. Seaweed can also help slow the breakdown of carbohydrates in your body, regulating your blood sugar. What’s more, the significant iodine content of seaweed can help you maintain a normal metabolism! There’s no reason not to get into seaweed for the summer. Seaweed is a salt replacement Seaweed possesses flavour boosting properties which make it ideal as a replacement for salt. Clearly, seaweed for the summer is the perfect way to make those tasty summer salads even healthier. Excess salt leads to high blood pressure, which can hugely impact your health. Swapping out your salt intake for dried seaweed provides your body with more vital nutrients whilst also reducing your sodium intake. Seaweed boosts your skin and hair Seaweed for the summer can do wonders for your skin and hair as well as your body, and after all everyone wants to look great in the warmer months! Seaweed is becoming a popular ingredient in skincare, particularly cleansers, due to its mattifying and purifying oceanic properties. Seaweed can even reduce the residue of free radicals which can cause premature ageing. Seaweed boosts your hair health...

The history of seaweed reveals the story of how seaweed saved the crew of the Grimsby trawler

The history of seaweed is rich and fascinating, showing how the sea plant has saved lives in the past A small piece of seaweed saved the lives of the trawler Lord Darling and her crew in a miraculously strange episode from the history of seaweed. Originally built in Selby in 1914, the Lord Darling was originally called the Prince Palatine under the ownership of the Cargill Steam Fishing Company of Hull but was renamed in 1923 when she joined Consolidated Fisheries in Grimsby. This particular episode in the history of seaweed took place in the 1930s. On an expedition off the west coast of Scotland, the 19-year-old trawler — battered by roaring winds and wild seas — developed a leak. It seemed that all would be lost off Cape Wrath as water flooded into the vessel, which was almost completely submerged for nearly three quarters of an hour. Then, suddenly, it seemed to right itself. Even with water rising in the ship, Skipper Osborne and the rest of the Darling’s crew were able to navigate and beach the vessel in Loch Ewe. They had no idea why the ship had not sunk completely. What the crew then discovered was how this ship became an incredible story in the history of seaweed. The reason behind the ship’s survival on the water was downright miraculous… As Lord Darling was beached at Loch Ewe, Osborne discovered a small piece of seaweed wedged into a hole in the side of the ship, plugging up the damage. With the help of four villagers, the crew managed to dry the ship, repair the hole and...

Seaweed for weight loss — are sea plants the key to fighting obesity?

Jessica Pahl, a student from Queensland, has received a grant of $45,000 to undertake ground-breaking research into whether we should all be using seaweed for weight loss We all know that seaweed is a superfood, but did you know there’s now growing evidence to suggest we should all be using seaweed for weight loss too? Pahl, 22, received her grant from the State Government. It will go towards research into whether there is a strong enough connection to be using seaweed for weight loss. Pahl will be conducting her research as she works towards her PhD. The bursary will help her finance conducting three rounds of tests to thoroughly examine the effectiveness of seaweed for weight loss. These tests will be carried out on albino rats. Pahl will supply the rats with the seaweed in powder form, allowing them to consume it easily. Pahl hopes that her research will eventually lead to the possibility of human trials. Her goal is to create a potential new anti-obesity pill. Seaweed for weight loss is not a new subject for Pahl. This Government bursary marks a continuation of research conducted by both her school and by James Cook University. According to Pahl, this past research yielded “exciting results”. Pahl will be testing different kinds of seaweed, studying a spectrum of species with varying fibre and antioxidant levels so that she can find the most effective seaweed for weight loss. Is there other evidence to suggest using seaweed for weight loss? The popularity of seaweed both as a superfood and using seaweed for weight loss soared back in 2015 when famous chef Jamie...

Seaweed Benefits in 2017

As the New Year begins, there are a plethora of articles on seaweed benefits for a healthy start to 2017.  This is true all around the world. From the UK, to India to South Africa. These seaweed benefits include helping address weight management, which is so often the New Year burden after an indulgent Christmas period. Research on seaweed benefits has shown that key seaweeds, and their specific compounds, can aid with weight loss and management in a few different ways.  These include: Fat Absorption: Research on specific seaweed polysaccharides has shown that there is inhibition of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of fats.  This means less fat is absorbed, and more just passes through the body and is excreted. Satiety: Research on these polysaccharides has shown that their natural gelling agent, and delayed stomach emptying may result in actual increased feeling of fullness. A paper published on this highlights that those eating seaweed enriched bread ate significantly less calories at a subsequent meal as compared to those eating a control bread. Blood sugar management: Research on specific seaweed polyphenols has shown inhibition of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of carbohydrates. This means that carbohydrates are broken down more slowly, which means a slower release of sugars to the blood.  It could be regarded as similar to eating a slow release food like porridge versus a high sugar food like milk chocolate that gives an initial high spike in blood sugar, and then a crash which may make you hungry again. Metabolism: Iodine is a key trace element present in seaweeds. Ensuring the right species from the right supply...

Seaweed Ingredients Still Have Huge Potential

A recent article in Food Navigator USA reports experts saying algae and seaweed ingredients still have huge potential Seaweed ingredients offer a plethora of benefits for the food, beverage and nutrition markets. The article highlights how there has been aspects of over promising and under delivering, specifically in the micro-algae industry. It states that  seaweed ingredients still have huge potential. Entrepreneurs didn’t always anticipate the technical challenges.  Furthermore there were distractions (and still are) with a focus on algae for biofuel.  The need to fulfil higher value food, nutrition, biomedical markets is where the opportunity is before we reach biofuel levels. Many of the benefits of micro algae and macro algae (seaweed) ingredients are laid our in the article, including medicine, proteins, nutrition, low calorie etc.  Many of the big challenges we face, from sustainability of food supply to addressing malnutrition, obesity and diabetes can all be solved with seaweed ingredients. Scalability of production systems, of a high quality has been a barrier also. The economics must work.  At Seaweed & Co. we focus on wild harvested species and have invested in supply chains that can maintain sustainability and have huge potential to grow.  From 1kg to 10,000 tonnes, we know we can deliver.  In addition, we are leading cultivation projects on species that don’t have a long term or scalable sustainable future from wild harvest. Seaweed ingredients still have huge potential Despite many successes, it is true that seaweed and algae and seaweed still offer huge opportunity to address market demands. These opportunities are yet to be realised for a number of reasons.  The main contrinutor to the...

Seaweed for weight loss: Obesity and diabetes at Food Matters Live

Dr Craig Rose will be speaking on seaweed for weight loss at Food Matters Live this November.  The event covers many topics, and with a specific seminar on Obesity and Weight Management in diabetes.  This includes Dr Rose, who will talk on “Seaweed: the ingredient to benefit weight management and tackle diabetes?” Food Matters Live is billed as the UK’s only cross-sector event.  It brings together the food and drink industry, retailers, foodservice providers, government and those working in nutrition, to enable collaboration and innovation to support a sustainable food landscape for the future. Having spoken at previous Food Matters Live events on seaweed for salt replacement, and seaweed as a sustainable future food, Dr Rose has been invited back.  With on-going research on the benefits and potential of seaweed to address obesity and diabetes, and evidence of seaweed for weight loss, seaweed is an ideal fit for this year’s event. In addition to excellent speakers and exhibitors, making the whole event worth a visit, the seminar on Obesity and Weight Management in diabetes, will be on Thursday 24th November 2016. Seaweed for weight loss Seaweed for weight loss has had a traditional application, with more recent advances and research understanding the mechanisms.  Seaweed & Co. is at the forefront of this research, with partners including Newcastle University medical school.  The University has been researching specific seaweed extracts (alginates), which have proven seaweed for weight loss is very positive.  The seaweed extracts can reduce fat absorption, which means fats pass through the body without leading to weight gain.  This work continues. In addition, seaweed for weight loss and diabetes is...