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Seaweed for weight loss — are sea plants the key to fighting obesity?

Jessica Pahl, a student from Queensland, has received a grant of $45,000 to undertake ground-breaking research into whether we should all be using seaweed for weight loss We all know that seaweed is a superfood, but did you know there’s now growing evidence to suggest we should all be using seaweed for weight loss too? Pahl, 22, received her grant from the State Government. It will go towards research into whether there is a strong enough connection to be using seaweed for weight loss. Pahl will be conducting her research as she works towards her PhD. The bursary will help her finance conducting three rounds of tests to thoroughly examine the effectiveness of seaweed for weight loss. These tests will be carried out on albino rats. Pahl will supply the rats with the seaweed in powder form, allowing them to consume it easily. Pahl hopes that her research will eventually lead to the possibility of human trials. Her goal is to create a potential new anti-obesity pill. Seaweed for weight loss is not a new subject for Pahl. This Government bursary marks a continuation of research conducted by both her school and by James Cook University. According to Pahl, this past research yielded “exciting results”. Pahl will be testing different kinds of seaweed, studying a spectrum of species with varying fibre and antioxidant levels so that she can find the most effective seaweed for weight loss. Is there other evidence to suggest using seaweed for weight loss? The popularity of seaweed both as a superfood and using seaweed for weight loss soared back in 2015 when famous chef Jamie...

EU botanical health claims discussion may finally be back on track

EU botanical health claims have had their discussion delayed for seven long years, but things seem to be turning around after VitaFoods 2017 Work by the European Commission to achieve clarity regarding EU botanical health claims have been constantly faced with delays since 2010. However, a number of public and industry consultations have recently been reaching conclusions, showing that agreements might finally be being made. Feedback from these conclusions are expected by the end of 2017, and will form the basis for recommendations. This report is particularly anticipated by those who attended the VitaFoods conference back in early May. So why have these EU botanical health claims been deferred for so long? Well, this huge delay is actually the result of clashing rules regarding EU botanical health claims — in particular, claims on botanicals used in foods and claims for therapeutic uses of traditional herbal medicines. Discrepancies like these make it difficult to know for sure how botanical ingredients should be dealt with so that no misleading health claims appear on food supplements containing botanical ingredients. These factors come together and make it extremely difficult to create accurate and provable EU botanical health claims. As a result of the delay, some countries even took matter into their own hands. Italy, France and Belgium cooperated voluntarily in order to create a common approach made to regulate botanical use in food supplements. This was named the BELFRIT project to reflect the countries involved. However, progress has been made by the European Commission itself to help bring us closer to EU botanical health claims, through the Commission’s own project as part of...

Research into seaweed

Incredible results found through research into seaweed involving Doctor Seaweed published in Algal Research Doctor Seaweed himself has discovered some eye-opening findings through research into seaweed, demonstrating that there’s always more to learn about this fascinating oceanic plant. The research into seaweed by Doctor Seaweed® and his peers – published in Algal Research – aimed to research the effects of reproductive sterility on the green seaweed Ulva rigida, in hopes of finding that reproductive sterility could help exploit the seaweed for commercial applications. This research into seaweed was inspired by findings from previous research into seaweed, many of which came across difficulties maintaining Ulva species in the vegetative state, as the formation and release of reproductive cells often stopped Ulva growth entirely and sometimes led to disintegration. These results were surprising for researchers, as the Ulva species is known for its high growth rates and tolerance of a variety of environments. It has been implemented into food, biofuel feedstock and plays a role in the delivery of wastewater and CO2 remediation services – and all of this has resulted in a high distribution of the species commercially. The use of Ulva commercially meant that it became vital to find robust strains of the species and find a way to exploit it effectively, and this was the precise aim of the research into seaweed published in Algal Research by Doctor Seaweed®. The method of this research into seaweed involved obtaining a sterile mutant of Ulva rigida by mutating a wild type strain of the same species, using ultraviolet radiation. The research into seaweed aimed to develop a sterile strain which...